Six Cats Rescued from Thorncliffe Park, Toronto

UPDATE: January 10, 2012 – The last one has proved somewhat elusive. Several attempts to trap her have failed. Today we learned why: Kittens! This last kitty is a mama. She was spotted with two kittens today. It is possible there are more back in the den. It is important to find where the kittens are “stashed” before taking the mum or else we risk leaving the kittens defenseless and without a food source, both conditions that would likely lead to their deaths. Hopefully, I will soon report that mum and babies are all safe and warm inside!

UPDATE: January 2, 2012 – We got another one today, a youngster, So Eight now. That’s a good thing because the youngsters stand much less of a chance in the shocking cold weather that is hitting us tonight! A total of eight now, nine withe the one that was delivered This little girl is now with the rest of her pals at Special Ones Cat Rescue, and now there’s two to go (as far as we know!)

UPDATE: January 2, 2012 – We got another one today, a youngster, So Eight now. That’s a good thing because the youngsters stand much less of a chance in the shocking cold weather that is hitting us tonight! A total of eight now, nine with the one that was delivered. This little girl is now with the rest of her pals at Special Ones Cat Rescue, and now there’s two to go (as far as we know!)


UPDATE: January 1, 2012 – We saw a big girl we thought could potentially be a mama and we were worried that there might be kittens inside that huge wall space. We did not want to take a mom and thus leave behind kittens, so we hired big cuddly Gemil Lacroix from G1000 Home Inspections who showed up for the job with a boroscope, which is a camera with something that looks like a very thin elephant trunk. It’s the “trunk” that goes into the places we can’t and provides us with a view of what we could not see on our own. Gemil was very kind to come out on this cold New Year’s Day and did an awesome job looking for the babies. We could tell it wasn’t “just a job” for Gemil, that he truly cared about helping the kitties. In the end, we did not find any babies so we are now free to trap this big girl and finally bring her inside into the warmth.

UPDATE: December 28, 2011 – We got another one! So Seven now. This one too went to Special Ones Cat Rescue

THE STORY BEGINS HERE:


An urgent plea went out to all the rescue-groups/rescuers that cats at Thorncliffe Park in Toronto were being abused by both residents and management, not to mention coyotes.

Lilly and I went out there with traps and carriers and were met by Jackie, the woman who had been feeding them on location for some time. Jackie took us to the hole in the wall in which the kitties have been living (see photo on the right,) and we began to set up our traps. Jackie was able to get some of them into carriers as these cats are friendly cats, trusting little souls used to being fed by a human.

All in all, it took just a little over three hours to get six cats, which is actually relatively quick for that many cats, and we did count our blessings, and fingers and toes as we were thawing them.. Three hours can end up feeling like a lot more when it’s as cold as it was that day.

Elke arrived just in time to transport them to their destination Special Ones Cat Rescue in Oakville, Ontario – thank you Karen for acting so quickly on this one!

When we left, there was one cat left behind. The next day two more cats “arrived.” We are going back tomorrow to get the rest. Our goal is to have everybody inside before the new year.. 🙂

To be continued..

Here’s the video:

Toronto Cats for Adoption: Rosie and the Lap Cats

Kitty Poster

UPDATE: February 2011 – All four kittens have now found their forever homes.

These kitties were rescued, socialized, spayed/neutered, and vaccinated.

Looking for really great homes where they will be loved, adored, and pampered for the next 20-25 years no matter what! They have been together since birth, so ideally they would go in pairs.

If you are interested, you can contact me through the contact form below or leave me a comment (scroll down to the end of the page).

This is where Rosie and her brothers were being raised by their mom

Rosie
Einie
Rosie, Einie & Kink
These kittens were being raised along the side of a garage, on the brink of an underground parking driveway.

Rosie, Einie & Kink
The Kittens
The Driveway
The odds of their survival were not good, especially as winter was approaching and mom was unable to find covered shelter. In fact, of her previous litter – there was only one survivor.

The Mama

The Mama
Pixie is all of seven pounds at full adult site. A young queen (‘unaltered’ female cat) who has had a number of litters (something she had no real choice about) outdoors. Pixie has since been spayed and is now living inside. She is still quite timid.

Generally, the older they are when they are brought in, the longer it takes for them to socialize. That said, they are very much the individuals and there is no formula to determine how long it will take. If you have any experience with cats, then you know that they do everything on their own timetable. “You can’t rush a turtle” also applies to the cat.

That said, no matter what anyone tells you about it not being possible to socialize “ferral” cats, it’s not true in over ninety-percent of cases. Most are so happy to be inside (the Canadian outdoors is just no place for cats in the winter), that once they have gotten over their natural fear of you (a most basic fear of being eaten), they are grateful and loving in a way no home raised cats can know.

The Papa

Patches is a very big and very beautiful boy! It took Patches all of six months to decide that befriending humans was definitely the way to go.

Having been inside for about a year, Patches is now a most affectionate lap cat of all things! He is so incredibly content – it’s quite gratifying. Non-managed outdoor cats typically live an average of several hours to three years at most (the exclusion being some exceptionally managed colonies.)